Review: Mont Marte Twistable Colours. 8/10 Worth it, baby!

Twistable Colours by Mont Marte
Twistable Colours by Mont Marte

Today I will be showcasing this new $20 item from your local discount store: the Mont Marte twistable colours.

I was introduced to these during an art therapy appointment on Thursday and sent Sandie out to buy them for me the next day. I was THAT impressed.

Let me start by saying these are for kids… unless you’re an adult, in which case they are definitely for artistic adults.

Twistable Colours by Mont Marte
Twistable Colours by Mont Marte

In this pack you receive 24 colours and a paintbrush. There is a larger pack available but I haven’t seen it except on the Mont Marte website.

During art therapy, I used it on 190gsm smooth postcard paper and it struggled to accept the water: because these colour sticks LOVE water!

To use them for this test, I used Mont Marte A5 300gsm watercolour paper, the paintbrush provided and the colour sticks.

Mont Marte A5 300gsm Watercolour Pad
Mont Marte A5 300gsm Watercolour Pad

Using the cover of my pad as inspiration, I roughly drew out the image with the colour sticks.

Initial Sketch using Watercolour Pad cover as inspiration
Initial Sketch using Watercolour Pad cover as inspiration

I’m not happy with how I did the background but I did learn a lot from this. I have used multiple colours over and next to each other for both foreground and background items. The colour sticks go on creamy and soft, like a warmed oil pastel. Or lipstick. Or even a crayon. Definitely like a crayon.

Continuing Artwork using Watercolour Pad cover as inspiration
Continuing Artwork using Watercolour Pad cover as inspiration

Then I started blending the background with my fingers. It was at this point I realised I didn’t like my colour choice but I was curious to know if it was salvageable or not.Then using my fingers I blended the foreground.

Blending with fingers
Blending with fingers

Like pastels the blending makes marks on your fingers. I did NOT clean my fingers when going from one section to another although I did tend to stick to each colour before moving on to the next.

Then I started to add water to the background and the darker areas under the flowers. These sticks love water. I added much more water than I have ever done in watercolours and I was glad I was using the thicker paper.

So much water and they loved it!
So much water and they loved it!

When you add water the colour become like a creamy watercolour paint making blending almost effortless and you can push the paint around quite easily with the brush.

I only used the brush provided when making this piece. After I have added water to the background, you can see the difference the water makes. Interestingly, even though I used a LOT more water, I didn’t end up with muddy water and my brush always washed clean. I had no need for a second bowl of water.

Adding water with the brush
Adding water with the brush

Here I have started adding water to the foreground areas

Adding water to specific areas
Adding water to specific areas

And then water to the flowers themselves

Adding water to specific areas
Adding water to specific areas

The brush was good at defining details. After I had finished with the water, I gave it about 2 minutes to rest. (It was very tired.)

Rest little artwork.
Rest little artwork.

Finally I grabbed my 8B pencil (because I couldn’t find my waterproof pen) and loosely defined some areas on the flowers and leaves.

Final outlining.
Final outlining.

I was pretty happy with how this turned out and would highly recommend these “kids” art products.

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